George Sperling


(949) 824-6879
sperling@uci.edu


Personal Statement


Vitas, Publication Lists, Summaries


Nine Review Articles


Publications


Abstracts (1996-1999)


Human Information Processing Laboratory: George Sperling; Staff; AIC Conference; Classes

Department of Cognitive Sciences

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior

Institute for Mathematical Behavioral Sciences


George Sperling: Personal Statement

In college, at the University of Michigan, I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know which branch of science, so I majored in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biology. Then I did a brief stint in biophysics before discovering physiological psychology and, at last, perceptual and cognitive psychology. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard in 1959 for a thesis on short-term memory. My goal then, as now, was to apply the quantitative and theoretical methods of the hard sciences to the analysis of cognitive processes.

My early research dealt with empirical studies of human information processing (very short-term visual memory systems, post-stimulus masking, and the like) and with mathematical/neural models of the visual processes of light adaptation, flicker sensitivity, contrast detection, and stereopsis. More recently, Adam Reeves and I developed a mathematical theory for temporal attentional filtering, and a corresponding psychophysical method for measuring shifts of visual attention. Erich Weichselgartner and I exploited these methods to show that movements of attention across the visual field are quantal not analog, and to measure the different dynamics of automatic and controlled attention. We also developed a general method for measuring the time course of almost any perceptual event, and applied it to the perception of extremely brief flashes. Shui-I Shih and I developed a paradigm to show that early attentional filtering in search tasks, which is possible for space or time, is not possible for physical features such as "red", although attentional filtering of features can control input to short-term memory (work with Steve Wurst and Zhong-Lin Lu). Revisiting an early theme, Karl Gegenfurtner and I worked out a computational model for the acquisition and decay of items in iconic memory.

Jan van Santen and I developed a mathematical theory based on elaborated Reichardt detectors to account for many of the essential phenomena of classical motion psychophysics. Then, Charles Chubb and I discovered motion displays that would be invisible to all motion detector mechanisms that had thus far been proposed, including Reichardt detectors. With these displays, we identified second-order motion and pattern perception systems not known previously, work that continued with Joshua Solomon and Peter Werkhoven. Recently, Zhong-Lin Lu and I developed a "pedestal" paradigm that enabled us to isolate and characterize the three visual motion-perception systems that operate simultaneously in human perception. Other projects, with many collaborators, involved dynamic image processing of American Sign Language to enable it to be transmitted on ordinary telephone channels. In teaching, I noted that precisely the same optimization computation is used in signal detection theory and in resource theories of attention. Barbara Dosher and I found that a similar optimization theory applies to cognitive strategies in information-processing tasks.

Some of the projects listed above have yielded such detailed flowcharts of "cognitive microprocesses" that it seemed it might be possible to localize these processes in the brain. So, recently, I've begun work in brain imaging with fMRI, MEG, and EEG, mainly in collaberation with Zhong-Lin Lu, as well as in primate single-cell recording (at Salk) in which the focus has been the identification of brain mechanisms of motion perception and attention.

I discovered early that collaborative research is the most fun, and my current research continues the themes in vision and attention with student, postdoctoral, and faculty colleagues.

The Human Information Processing Laboratory, where these projects are carried out, offers computer facilities for almost any project in perception or cognition. Students learn about cognitive science and also acquire facility with computer systems, with complex, modern experimental techniques, and with methods of modeling and formal theory construction, and develop the diverse technical skills they need to work at the forefront of knowledge.


Vitas, Publications Lists, Summaries ( indicates "pdf download, may require Macintosh Acrobat 5.0 or PC Acrobat 4.0 or higher")

Sperling: Curriculum Vita

Sperling: Publications, Reprintings, Talks and Posters at Conferences, Invited Lectures at Universities and Institutes (51pp).

Sperling: Publications including published abstracts, Reprintings, Talks and Posters at Conferences, Invited Lectures at Universities and Institutes (60pp).

This Week's Citation Classic: Sperling, G. The information available in brief visual presentations. Psychological Monogr. 74: 1-29, 1960. Current Contents, 1979, 21, 18. (Historical background of this research.)

Anon Biography (upon receipt of American Psychological Association, Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award). American Psychologist, 1989, 44, 626-628.


Review Articles ( indicates "pdf download, may require Macintosh Acrobat 5.0 or PC Acrobat 4.0 or higher")

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2001). Three-systems theory of human visual motion perception: Review and update. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 18, 2331-2370.

Sperling, G., Reeves, A., Blaser, E., Lu, Z.-L., & Weichselgartner, E. (2001). Two computational models of attention. In J. Braun, C. Koch, & J. L. Davis (Eds.), Visual attention and cortical circuits. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 177-214 + four color plates.

Dosher, B. A., & Sperling, G. (1998). A century of human information-processing theory: Vision, attention, and memory. In J. Hochberg (Ed.), Perception and cognition at century's end. New York: Academic Press. Pp. 199-252.

Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1998). A systems analysis of visual motion perception. In T. Watanabe (Ed.), High-level motion processing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 153-183.

Sperling, G., & Weichselgartner, E. (1995). Episodic theory of the dynamics of spatial attention. Psychological Review, 102, 503-532.

Sperling, G., Chubb, C., Solomon, J. A., & Lu, Z.-L. (1994). Full-wave and half-wave processes in second-order motion and texture. In Higher-order processing in the visual system. Chichester, UK: Wiley (Ciba Foundation Symposium, 184). Pp. 287-303. Discussion: Pp. 303-308.

Sperling, G., & Dosher, B. A. (1994). Depth from motion. In T. V. Papathomas (Ed.), Early vision and beyond. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 133-142.

Sperling, G. (1989). Three stages and two systems of visual processing. Spatial Vision, 4 [Prazdny Memorial Issue], 183-207.

Sperling, G., & Dosher, B. A. (1986). Strategy and optimization in human information processing. In K. Boff, L. Kaufman, & J. Thomas (Eds.), Handbook of perception and human performance: Vol. 1. Sensory processes and perception. New York: Wiley. Pp. 2-1 to 2-65.

 

 

Publications

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2012). Black-White asymmetry in visual perception. Journal of Vision, In Press.

Krishnan, L., Kang, A., Sperling, G., and Srinivasan, R. (2012). Neural strategies for selective attention distinguish fast-action video game players. Brain Topography, DOI 10.1007/s10548-012-0232-3. 15pp.

Drew, S. A., Chubb, C. F., & Sperling, G. (2010). Precise attention filters for Weber contrast derived from centroid estimations. Journal of Vision, 10(10):20, 1-16.

Blaser, E. & Sperling, G. (2008). When is motion motion? Perception. 37, 624-627.

Chubb, C., Nam, J.-H., Bindman, D. R., & Sperling, G. (2007). The three dimensions of human visual sensitivity to first-order contrast statistics. Vision Research, 47, 2237-2248.

Ding, J., & Sperling, G. (2007). Binocular combination: Measurements and a model. In L. Harris & M. Jenkin (Eds.), Computational vision in neural and machine systems. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 257-305

Appelbaum, L. G., Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2007) Contrast amplification in global texture orientation discrimination. Journal of Vision, 10 (7), 1-19.

Tseng, C.-h., Gobell, J. L., Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2006). When motion appears stopped: Stereo motion standstill. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 103. 14953-14958.

Ding, J., Sperling, G., & Srinivasan, R. (2006). Attentional modulation of SSVEP power depends on the network tagged by the flicker frequency. Cerebral Cortex, 16. 1016-1019

Ding, J., & Sperling, G. (2006) A gain-control theory of binocular combination. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 103 (4), 1141-1146.

Gobell, J., Tseng, C.-h., & Sperling, G. (2004). The spatial distribution of visual attention. Vision Research, 44, 1273-1296.

Tseng, C.-h., Gobell, J., & Sperling, G. (2004). Long-lasting sensitization to a given colour after visual search. Nature, 428, 657-660.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2003). Measuring sensory memory: Magnetoencephalography habituation and psychophysics. In Z.-L. Lu & L. Kaufman (Eds.), Magnetic source imaging of the human brain. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Pp. 319-342.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2002). Stereomotion is processed by the third-order motion system: Reply to comment on "Three-systems theory of human visual motion perception: review and update." J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 19, 2144-2153.

Shih, S., & Sperling, G. (2002). Measuring and modeling the trajectory of visual spatial attention. Psychological Review, 109, 260-305.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2001). Three-systems theory of human visual motion perception: Review and update. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 18, 2331-2370.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (2001). Sensitive calibration and measurement procedures based on the amplification principle in motion perception. Vision Research, 41, 2355-2374.

Sperling, G., Reeves, A., Blaser, E., Lu, Z.-L., & Weichselgartner, E. (2001). Two computational models of attention. In J. Braun, C. Koch, & J. L. Davis (Eds.), Visual attention and cortical circuits. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 177-214 + four color plates.

Sperling, G. (2001). Motion perception models. In N. J. Smelser & P. B. Baltes (Eds.), 2001 International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Oxford, UK: Pergamon. Pp. 10093-10099.

or (HTML) Lu, Z.-L., Lesmes, L. A., & Sperling, G. (1999). Perceptual motion standstill in rapidly moving chromatic displays. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 96, 15374-15379.

or (HTML) Blaser, E., Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1999). Measuring the amplification of attention. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 96, 11681-11686.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1999). Second-order reversed phi. Perception and Psychophysics, 61, 1075-1088.

or (HTML) Lu, Z.-L., Lesmes, L. A., & Sperling, G. (1999). The mechanism of isoluminant chromatic motion perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 96, 8289-8294.

Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1998). A systems analysis of visual motion perception. In T. Watanabe (Ed.), High-level motion processing. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 153-183.

Dosher, B. A., & Sperling, G. (1998). A century of human information-processing theory: Vision, attention, and memory. In J. Hochberg (Ed.), Perception and cognition at century's end. New York: Academic Press. Pp. 199-252.

Chubb, C., Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1997). Structure detection: A statistically certified unsupervised learning procedure. Vision Research (Special Issue: The Vision of Natural and Complex Images), 37, 3343-3365.

Sperling, G. (1997). The goal of theory in experimental psychology. In R. L. Solso (Ed.), Mind and brain sciences in the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 253-264.

Sperling, G., Lu, Z.-L., & Chubb, C. (1996). First principles of second-order perception. In 1996 SID International Symposium Digest of Technical Papers: Vol. XXVII. Santa Ana, CA: Society for Information Display. Pp. 961-964.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1996). Contrast gain control in first- and second-order motion perception. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 13, 2305-2318.

Shih, S., & Sperling, G. (1996). Is there feature-based attentional selection in visual search? J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 22, 758-779.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1996). Three systems for visual motion perception. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 5, 44-53.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1996). Second-order illusions: Mach bands, Chevreul, and Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet. Vision Research, 36, 559-572.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1995). Attention-generated apparent motion. Nature, 377, 237-239.

Sperling, G., & Weichselgartner, E. (1995). Episodic theory of the dynamics of spatial attention. Psychological Review, 102, 503-532.

Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1995). The functional architecture of human visual motion perception. Vision Research, 35, 2697-2722.

Sutter, A., Sperling, G., & Chubb, C. (1995). Measuring the spatial frequency selectivity of second-order texture mechanisms. Vision Research, 35, 915-924.

Solomon, J. A., & Sperling, G. (1995). 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision. Vision Research, 35, 59-64.

Werkhoven, P., Sperling, G., & Chubb, C. (1994). Perception of apparent motion between dissimilar gratings: Spatiotemporal properties. Vision Research, 34, 2741-2759.

Shih, S., & Sperling, G. (1994). Using cluster analysis to discover and characterize covert strategies. Psychological Science, 5, 175-178.

Sperling, G., Chubb, C., Solomon, J. A., & Lu, Z.-L. (1994). Full-wave and half-wave processes in second-order motion and texture. In Higher-order processing in the visual system. Chichester, UK: Wiley (Ciba Foundation Symposium, 184). Pp. 287-303. Discussion: Pp. 303-308.

Sperling, G., Solomon, J. A., Lu, Z.-L., & Chubb, C. (1994). Visual preprocessing: First- and second-order processes in the perception of motion and texture. In J. M. Zurada, R. J. Marks II, & C. J. Robinson (Eds.), Computational intelligence: Imitating life. New York: IEEE Press, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. Pp. 223-236.

Solomon, J. A., & Sperling, G. (1994). Full-wave and half-wave rectification in second-order motion perception. Vision Research, 34, 2239-2257.

Sperling, G., & Dosher, B. A. (1994). Depth from motion. In T. V. Papathomas (Ed.), Early vision and beyond. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 133-142.

Chubb, C., McGowan, J., Sperling, G., & Werkhoven, P. (1994). Non-Fourier motion analysis. In Higher-order processing in the visual system. Chichester, UK: Wiley (Ciba Foundation Symposium, 184). Pp. 193-205. Discussion: Pp. 206-210.

Solomon, J. A., Sperling, G., & Chubb, C. (1993). The lateral inhibition of perceived contrast is indifferent to on-center/off-center segregation, but specific to orientation. Vision Research, 33, 2671-2683.

Gegenfurtner, K., & Sperling, G. (1993). Information transfer in iconic memory experiments. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 19, 845-866.

Werkhoven, P., Sperling, G., & Chubb, C. (1993). The dimensionality of texture-defined motion: A single channel theory. Vision Research, 33, 463-485.

Sperling, G., Wurst, S. A., & Lu, Z.-L. (1992). Using repetition detection to define and localize the processes of selective attention. In D. E. Meyer & S. Kornblum (Eds.), Attention and performance XIV: Synergies in experimental psychology, artificial intelligence, and cognitive neuroscience - A silver jubilee. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. 265-298.

Chubb, C., & Sperling, G. (1991). Texture quilts: Basic tools for studying motion-from-texture. J. Math. Psychol., 35, 411-442.

Parish, D. H., & Sperling, G. (1991). Object spatial frequencies, retinal spatial frequencies, noise, and the efficiency of letter discrimination. Vision Research, 31, 1399-1415.

Landy, M. S., Dosher, B. A., Sperling, G., & Perkins, M. E. (1991). The kinetic depth effect and optic flow--II. First- and second-order motion. Vision Research, 31, 859-876.

Sperling, G. (1990). Comparison of perception in the moving and stationary eye. In E. Kowler (Ed.), Eye movements and their role in visual and cognitive processes. Amsterdam: Elsevier Biomedical Press. Pp. 307-351.

Sperling, G., Dosher, B. A., & Landy, M. S. (1990). How to study the kinetic depth effect experimentally. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 16, 445-450.

Farrell, J. E., Pavel, M., & Sperling, G. (1990). The visible persistence of stimuli in stroboscopic motion. Vision Research, 30, 921-936.

Parish, D. H., Sperling, G., & Landy, M. S. (1990). Intelligent temporal subsampling of American Sign Language using event boundaries. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 16, 282-294.

Sperling, G. (1989). Three stages and two systems of visual processing. Spatial Vision, 4 [Prazdny Memorial Issue], 183-207.

Chubb, C., Sperling, G., & Solomon, J. A. (1989). Texture interactions determine perceived contrast. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 86, 9631-9635.

Dosher, B. A., Landy, M. S., & Sperling, G. (1989). Kinetic depth effect and optic flow--I. 3D shape from Fourier motion. Vision Research, 29, 1789-1813.

Sperling, G., Landy, M. S., Dosher, B. A., & Perkins, M. E. (1989). Kinetic depth effect and identification of shape. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 15, 426-440.

Dosher, B. A., Landy, M. S., & Sperling, G. (1989). Ratings of kinetic depth in multidot displays. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 15, 816-825.

Chubb, C., & Sperling, G. (1989). Two motion perception mechanisms revealed through distance-driven reversal of apparent motion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA, 86, 2985-2989.

Chubb, C., & Sperling, G. (1989). Second-order motion perception: Space/time separable mechanisms. In Proceedings: Workshop on Visual Motion (March 20-22, 1989, Irvine, California). Washington, DC: IEEE Computer Society Press. Pp. 126-138.

Riedl, T. R., & Sperling, G. (1988). Spatial-frequency bands in complex visual stimuli: American Sign Language. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 5, 606-616.

Sperling, G. (1988). The magical number seven: Information processing then and now. In W. Hirst (Ed.), The making of cognitive science: Essays in honor of George A. Miller. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 71-80.

Chubb, C., & Sperling, G. (1988). Drift-balanced random stimuli: A general basis for studying non-Fourier motion perception. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 5, 1986-2007.

Pavel, M., Sperling, G., Riedl, T. R., & Vanderbeek, A. (1987). Limits of visual communication: The effects of signal-to-noise ratio on the intelligibility of American Sign Language. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 4, 2355-2365.

Weichselgartner, E., & Sperling, G. (1987). Dynamics of automatic and controlled visual attention. Science, 238, 778-780.

Sperling, G., & Dosher, B. A. (1986). Strategy and optimization in human information processing. In K. Boff, L. Kaufman, & J. Thomas (Eds.), Handbook of perception and human performance: Vol. 1. Sensory processes and perception. New York: Wiley. Pp. 2-1 to 2-65.   8.8 Mbytes         1.3 Mbytes

Reeves, A., & Sperling, G. (1986). Attention gating in short-term visual memory. Psychological Review, 93, 180-206.

Dosher, B. A., Sperling, G., & Wurst, S. A. (1986). Tradeoffs between stereopsis and proximity luminance covariance as determinants of perceived 3D structure. Vision Research, 26, 973-990.

Sperling, G. (1986). A signal-to-noise theory of the effects of luminance on picture memory: Comment on Loftus. J. Exptl. Psychology: General, 115, 189-192.

Sperling, G., Landy, M. S., Cohen, Y., & Pavel, M. (1985). Intelligible encoding of ASL image sequences at extremely low information rates. Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing, 31, 335-391.

Weichselgartner, E., & Sperling, G. (1985). Continuous measurement of visible persistence. J. of Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 11, 711-725.

Sperling, G., van Santen, J. P. H., & Burt, P. J. (1985). Three theories of stroboscopic motion perception. Spatial Vision, 1, 47-56.

van Santen, J. P. H., & Sperling, G. (1985). Elaborated Reichard detectors. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer. A, 2, 300-321.

Landy, M. S., Cohen, Y., & Sperling, G. (1984). HIPS: Image processing under Unix. Software and applications. Behavior Research Methods and Instrumentation, 16, 199-216.

Landy, M. S., Cohen, Y., & Sperling, G. (1984). HIPS: A Unix-based image processing system. Computer Vision, Graphics, and Image Processing, 25, 331-347.

(HIPS is the Human Information Processing Laboratory's Image Processing System.)

Sperling, G. (1984). A unified theory of attention and signal detection. In R. Parasuraman & D. R. Davies (Eds.), Varieties of attention. New York: Academic Press. Pp. 103-181.

van Santen, J. P. H., & Sperling, G. (1984). Temporal covariance model of human motion perception. J. Opt. Soc. Amer. A, 1, 451-473.

Kowler, E., & Sperling, G. (1983). Abrupt onsets do not aid visual search. Perception and Psychophysics, 34, 307-313.

Schwartz, B. J., & Sperling, G. (1983). Luminance controls the perceived 3D structure of dynamic 2D displays. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 17, 456-458.

Sperling, G., Pavel, M., Cohen, Y., Landy, M. S., & Schwartz, B. J. (1983). Image processing in perception and cognition. In O. J. Braddick & A. C. Sleigh (Eds.), Proceedings of Rank Prize Funds International Symposium at the Royal Society of London, 1982. Springer Series in Information Sciences: Vol. 11. Physical and Biological Processing of Images. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. Pp. 359-378.

Sperling, G. (1983). Why we need iconic memory. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 6, 37-39.

Sperling, G. (1981). Video transmission of American Sign Language and finger spelling: Present and projected bandwidth requirements. In A. Habibi & A. N. Netravali (Eds.), IEEE Transactions on Communications [Special Issue on Picture Communication Systems], Com-29, 1993-2002.

Burt, P., & Sperling, G. (1981). Time, distance, and feature trade-offs in visual apparent motion. Psychological Review, 88, 171-195.

Sperling, G. (1981). Mathematical models of binocular vision. In S. Grossberg (Ed.), Proceedings of the Symposium in Applied Mathematics of the American Mathematical Society and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics: Vol. 13. Mathematical Psychology and Psychophysiology. Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society, 281-300.

Kowler, E., & Sperling, G. (1980). Transient stimulation does not aid visual search: Implication for the role of saccades. Perception & Psychophysics, 27, 1-10.

Sperling, G., & Reeves, A. (1980). Measuring the reaction time of a shift of visual attention. In R. Nickerson (Ed.), Attention and performance VIII. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Pp. 347-360.

Didner, R., & Sperling, G. (1980). Perceptual delay: A consequence of metacontrast and apparent motion. J. Exptl. Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 6, 235-243.

Sperling, G. (1980). Bandwidth requirements for video transmission of American Sign Language and finger spelling. Science, 210, 797-799.

Sperling, G. (1979). Critical duration, supersummation, and the narrow domain of strength-duration experiments. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 2, 279-281.

Sperling, G., & Melchner, M. J. (1978). Visual search, visual attention, and the attention operating characteristic. In J. Requin (Ed.), Attention and performance VII. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Pp. 675-686.

Sperling, G., & Melchner, M. J. (1978). The attention operating characteristic: Examples from visual search. Science, 202, 315-318.

Sperling, G. (1978). Future prospects in language and communication for the congenitally deaf. In L. Liben (Ed.), Deaf children: Developmental perspectives. New York: Academic Press. Pp. 103-114.

Sperling, G., & Melchner, M. J. (1976). Estimating item and order information. J. Math. Psychol., 13, 192-213.

Sperling, G. (1976). Movement perception in computer-driven visual displays. Behavior Research Methods and Instrumentation, 8, 144-151.

Sperling, G., & Melchner, M. J. (1976). Visual search and visual attention. In V. D. Glezer (Ed.), Proceedings of the Fourth Symposium of Sensory System Physiology: Information Processing in Visual System. Leningrad: Academy of Sciences, Pavlov Institute of Physiology. Pp. 224-230.

Sperling, G. (1971). Information retrieval from two rapidly consecutive stimuli: A new analysis. Perception and Psychophysics, 9, 89-91.

Sperling, G. (1971). (1) Computer parasites and hosts: Practical advice on how to be a successful parasite at your host's computer installation. (2) The description and luminous calibration of CRO visual displays. (3) Flicker in computer-generated visual displays: Selecting a CRO phosphor and other problems. (4) Stereoscopic visual displays: Principles, viewing devices, alignment procedures. Behavior Research Methods and Instrumentation, 3, 147-158.

Sperling, G., Budiansky, J., Spivak, J. G., & Johnson, M. C. (1971). Extremely rapid visual search: The maximum rate of scanning letters for the presence of a numeral. Science, 174, 307-311.

Sperling, G. (1970). Binocular vision: A physical and a neural theory. Amercan Journal of Psychology, 83, 461-534.

Sperling, G. (1970). Short-term memory, long-term memory, and scanning in the processing of visual information. In F. A. Young & D. B. Lindsley (Eds.), Early experience and visual information processing in perceptual and reading disorders. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences. Pp. 198-218.

Sperling, G. (1970). Model of visual adaptation and contrast detection. Perception and Psychophysics, 8, 143-157.

Sperling, G., & Speelman, R. G. (1970). Acoustic similarity and auditory short-term memory: Experiments and a model. In D. A. Norman (Ed.), Models of human memory. New York: Academic Press. Pp. 149-202.

Sperling, G., & Sondhi, M. M. (1968). Model for visual luminance discrimination and flicker detection. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer., 58, 1133-1145.

Sperling, G. (1968). Phonemic model of short-term auditory memory. In Proceedings, 76th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, 3, 63-64.

Novak, S., & Sperling, G. (1967). Increment thresholds [Letter]. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer., 57, 542.

Sperling, G. (1967). Successive approximations to a model for short-term memory. Acta Psychologica, 27, 285-292.

Sperling, G. (1965). Temporal and spatial visual masking. I. Masking by impulse flashes. J. Opt. Soc. of Amer., 55, 541-559.

Sperling, G. (1964). Linear theory and the psychophysics of flicker. Documenta Ophthalmologica, 18, 3-15.

Novak, S., & Sperling, G. (1963). Visual thresholds near a continuously visible or briefly presented light-dark boundary. Optica Acta, 10, 187-191.

Sperling, G. (1963). A model for visual memory tasks. Human Factors, 5, 19-31.

Averbach, E., & Sperling, G. (1961). Short term storage of information in vision. In C. Cherry (Ed.), Information theory. Washington, DC: Butterworth & Co. Pp. 196-211.

Sperling, G. (1960). The information available in brief visual presentations. Psychological Monographs: General and Applied, 74(11, Whole No. 498). Pp. 1-29.

Sperling, G. (1960). Negative afterimage without prior positive image. Science, 131, 1613-1614.

A complete list of publications is available on request.

Abstracts 1996-1999

Sperling, G., Blaser, E., & Lu, Z.-L. (1999). The perceptual amplification of attention to color [Abstract]. Perception, 28(Suppl.), 57.

Sperling, G., & Blaser, E. (1998). Measuring the amplification factor of attention to color [Abstract]. Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society, 2, 24.

Sperling, G. (1998). First-order, second-order, and third-order motion systems [Abstract]. Perception, 27(Suppl.), 3.

Richman, S. N., & Sperling, G. (1998). Perception of line-segment textures [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 39(Suppl. 4), S857.

Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1998). Update on the three-motion-systems theory [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 39(Suppl. 4), S461.

Blaser, E., & Sperling, G. (1998). Measuring attention to color using an equivalent chromaticity paradigm [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 39(Suppl. 4), S873.

George Sperling, Abstracts of the Marschak Colloquium at UCLA.

Sperling, G., & Shih, S. (1997). Measuring and modeling selective attention in early visual processing [Abstract]. Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society, 2, 18.

Blaser, E., Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1997). Measuring the spatial resolution of visual attention [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 38(Suppl. 4), S687.

Chubb, C., Lu, Z.-L., & Sperling, G. (1997). Statistically certified unsupervised learning [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 38(Suppl. 4), S257.

Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1997). Proving the independence of first- and second-order motion systems [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 38(Suppl. 4), S237.

Lu, Z.-L., Sperling, G., & Beck, J. R. (1997). Selective adaptation of three motion systems [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 38(Suppl. 4), S237.

Sperling, G., & Lu, Z.-L. (1996). The functional architecture of visual motion perception [Abstract]. International Journal of Psychology, 31(3/4), 362.

Sperling, G. (1996). New theories of motion perception [Abstract]. International Journal of Psychology, 31(3/4),362.

Sperling, G. (1996). The mechanism of visual attention is the spatio-temporal salience map [Abstract]. International Journal of Psychology, 31(3/4), 258.

Shih, S., & Sperling, G. (1996). The time course of covert visual attention shift [Abstract]. International Journal of Psychology, 31(3/4), 109.


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